Volataic Cells – Production of Electricity on Kepler 62e

Research question :

What is the best metal to produce energy for batteries ?

 

Methodology :

  1. Prepare the salt bridge by putting filter paper into KCL
  2. Into six 100 ml  beakers put the metal solutions of :
    1. magnesium sulphate
    2. nickel sulphate
    3. iron sulphate
    4. copper sulphate
    5. zinc sulphate
    6. aluminium sulphate
  3. Put the metals which will act as a electrodes into solutions
  4. Put salt bridge into both of solutions
  5. To enable the measurement connect the voltmeter to electrodes

 

Apparatus:

  1. One or more humans
  2. Six 100mL glass beakers
  3. Voltmeter + pertaining wires [red and black wires with crocodile clips]
  4. Metals including Magnesium, Iron, Zinc, Copper, Aluminium, and Nickel in plate-form
  5. Metal solutions including: magnesium sulphate, nickel sulphate, iron sulphate, copper sulphate, zinc sulphate and aluminium sulphate
  6. KCl and one 250 mL beaker
  7. Filter paper of glass tube salt bridge

 

Variables:

Independent:

  • use of different metals and solutions

Dependent :

  • the change in volts

 

 

Metal Metal Potential Difference [V] Amt. [mL]
Zinc Copper 1.00 V 100
Nickel Iron 0.38 V 50
Magnesium Nickel 1.67 V 50
Iron Magnesium 1.36 V 50
Nickel Fe + Mg 1.40 V 50
Magnesium Copper 1.91 V 50
Aluminum Iron 0.95 V 50
Aluminum Copper 0.44 V 50
Aluminum Magnesium 2.12 V 50

 

Conclusion:

In conclusion, Aluminum and Magnesium resulted in the highest potential difference. This is mainly because  of the following table which explains why Aluminum and Magnesium yield the greatest potential difference.

12WP_20150311_0181

The metals used that had the greatest potential difference have the greatest standard electrode potential differences. This results in a higher voltage produced.

 

Improvements:

  • higher concentration of metal solutions as it would result in a higher potential difference
  • conduct the experiment multiple times and average
  • conduct experiment under standard conditions of 101 kPa and 278 Kelvin
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